Rushaan knitalong part 4: finishing

Since we knit Rushaan using seamless construction, what we have now is a big floppy piece of unblocked knitting. But we also have zero seaming to do!

Of course, we have to do other stuff to turn this floppy blob into a wearable sweater. In his final installment of the Rushaan knitalong, we'll walk through the steps to finishing the thing.

button and buttonband plackets

The buttonband is worked bottom-up, and the buttonhole band is worked sideways, both in garter stitch. After you've picked up the stitches at the base of the buttonband and worked a few rows, your piece will look something like this.

 
 Rushaan buttonband in progress

Rushaan buttonband in progress

 

The idea is to work the buttonband so that it's just slightly shorter than the sweater placket, to keep the thing nice and firm. I like to sew the band to the edge of the sweater as I go, using mattress stitch, so I know how much further I have to knit. Every inch or two, I just stop knitting and work a bit of mattress stitch.

Using mattress stitch to seam stockinette to garter stitch is simple. On the stockinette sweater edge, work through the horizontal bar between the outermost column of stitches and the column next to it. On the garter buttonband edge, work through the outermost column of purl stitches.

 
 Rushaan buttonband in progress, sewn to front sweater edge

Rushaan buttonband in progress, sewn to front sweater edge

 

For the buttonhole band, you'll pick up stitches along the opposite sweater edge and work the garter rows perpendicular to the sweater front. Once the two are finished, here's what you'll see. The instructions have you sewing down the base of the buttonhole band later on, but feel free to do it now if you'd like to tidy things up.

 
 Rushaan placket bands, completed

Rushaan placket bands, completed

 

neckband

The next step is to pick up stitches around the neck opening and work the neckband, following the pattern's row-by-row instructions. What you'll end up with is a henley collar that's gently rounded in front and lengthened with short rows in the back. Then you can graft the underarms using Kitchener stitch, weave in your ends, and admire your work!

If you used a particularly heavy yarn, or if you made one of the larger sizes, your sweater might benefit from a bit of added stability to prevent it from stretching and losing shape over time. One easy way to provide this is to use a run a line of crocheted slip stitches inside the sweater, along the columns of seam stitches outlining each armhole and shoulder. Because the seam stitches are purled on the right side, they pop right out on the wrong side of the fabric as a column of knit Vs. Just use a crochet hook the same size as your main needles and work a slip stitch right through both legs of each V, keeping to the wrong side of the fabric.

Since you haven't blocked anything, and there's a mix of garter and stockinette stitch with different row gauges, your unblocked sweater will warp in all sorts of unattractive ways.

 
 Unblocked floppy blob of finished sweater!

Unblocked floppy blob of finished sweater!

 

But after a warm bath and some buttons, everything will straighten out beautifully. As your sweater is drying, be sure to pin everything neatly into shape.

Rushaan finishing finished.jpg